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Highbury’s East Stand is opened

Story Highlights
  • Arsenal's East Stand history
  • Art Deco style in football stadiums
  • Herbert Chapman's bronze bust
  • Grade II listed buildings in London
  • Architects William Binnie and Claude Ferrier
  • Arsenal's first win in the East Stand
Despite Arsenal’s move to the Emirates Stadium and the subsequent demolition of Highbury, the club’s old home, one piece of iconic architecture continues to stand: the East Stand. With its renowned Marble Halls, this magnificent structure is a Grade II listed building that exudes history and nostalgia. Constructed in 1936, the East Stand is a fine example of the Art Deco style, which was prevalent during the interwar period. Its design was created to complement the surrounding Victorian houses. Architects William Binnie and Claude Ferrier spearheaded the project, implementing Art Deco principles to modernize ancient architectural themes, drawing influences from various eras.

Arsenal’s East Stand history!

The East Stand’s grand main entrance featured a Terrazzo floor embossed with the club’s emblem and was the previous home to the bronze bust of the late Herbert Chapman. This stand was not just an aesthetic marvel; it housed the boardroom, cocktail lounge, dressing rooms, press facilities, and central offices.
Art Deco style in football stadiums. skycleat.com

On October 24, 1936, the East Stand was officially opened. Its grandeur was the main event during Arsenal’s match against Grimsby Town that day, overshadowing the goalless draw. It wasn’t until two weeks later, on November 7, that Arsenal secured their first win in front of the newly erected East Stand. Leeds United was convincingly defeated 4-1, with Kirchen, Drake, Davison, and Milne all finding the back of the net.
Arsenal’s first win in the East Stand! skycleat.com
Despite the passage of time and the changes that have transpired, the East Stand remains a crucial piece of Arsenal’s rich history, a testament to the club’s heritage, and a constant reminder of its past glories

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